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JOIN OUR EFFORTS TO

create a planet positive economy

THROUGH INTERVENTIONS IN FINANCE AND MARKETS.

JOIN OUR EFFORTS TO

create a planet positive economy

THROUGH THE CREATION OF A NEW CURRENCY.

In order to avoid the catastrophic effects of climate change, radical changes to human activity are required.

The economy is one of the main drivers of human behaviour and activity.In the current economy, economic actors are incentivised to extract natural and social capital, in exchange for money. Little or no consideration is given to the side-effects (the positive and negative externalities) of extraction, production and consumption. However, the world’s resources are finite and therefore the extractive model of our economy is unsustainable. In other words, we are failing to “stay within our doughnut”.

On the other side of the coin, an economic system is perhaps the most powerful lever for systemic change. Resource allocation dictates which processes do and do not take place, and indirectly, what we value as a society.

How might we go about creating a planet-positive economy?

 

Constraints

Resource allocation decisions are made on the basis of a cost-benefit analysis, formal or otherwise. Capital allocation decisions are overwhelmingly made on the basis of risk and return: where will the risk-adjusted return be the highest? With this behaviour in mind (“capital will tend towards where it will generate more capital”), why is capital not flowing towards “climate-positive” or “planet-positive” activities in sufficient volume?

There are four main reasons:

1. Tragedy of the commons

• Economic actors — whether companies, governments, communities, or individuals — are incentivised to consume common-pool resources at the expense of all other actors, without any penalty, costs or tax, leading to depletion of the resource.

• Entities prioritise organizational gain over the needs of society and the planet.

 

2.  Polluting is less costly than not polluting

• Actors will opt against polluting when the cost of polluting outweighs the cost of not polluting. Currently, this is generally not the case.

 

3.  Polluting is more valuable than not polluting

• Actors will opt against polluting when the benefit of not polluting outweighs the benefit of polluting. Currently, this is generally not the case.

 

4.  The data required for planet-positive investment decision-making is lacking.

• To be able to categorise an asset as planet-positive or planet-negative, data is required. This data is missing, not of a good enough quality, or reliant on accurate disclosure. Often, it is more costly than beneficial for actors to gather and disclose this information.

• This problem is compounded by the lack of coverage and coherent regulation on climate disclosure.

 

Approaches we’re considering

Traditionally, solutions to these problems are viewed through the lens of regulatory change. For example, increasing the cost of pollution through government-imposed carbon pricing (whether through a tax or a market mechanism) is a potential solution to some of the negative externalities of production. Though carbon pricing is important, attempts so far have fallen far short of viable price levels and scope. Given government inaction, in spite of public pressure, it is insufficient to rely solely on governments to deal with the climate crisis.

We are exploring the creation of ventures that could sufficiently alter economic conditions to reorient capital towards “planet positive” activities. In other words, we are looking to create the building blocks of a climate — and nature — positive economy. We are exploring capital markets, financial sector, carbon markets, and commodities sector innovations including (but not limited to):

●  Capital and derivatives markets

●  Private debt and equity markets

●  Decision-making tools for sustainable/planet-positive investing

●  Planet positive financial instruments

●  Natural capital markets (e.g. carbon markets)

●  Novel applications of technologies (e.g. blockchain, remote sensing, machine learning, artificial intelligence, data science) for the above solutions

 

We are assembling the teams who will further investigate and ultimately co-found ventures in this space. We are looking for the first team members, advisors, partners and investors. Equally, we are looking to speak with anyone who has a unique or in depth perspective on the constraints and opportunities governing this space.

 

WHO should apply

You are motivated to build a company that benefits the planet. You are collaborative, committed to your teammates, and able to communicate clearly. You are creative, always asking why, and actively enjoy building a network around the problems and opportunities that you go after. You bring broad technical knowledge that is relevant to the opportunity area (see below).

 

Knowledge and skill’s we’re after (a mix of):

●  Carbon markets and climate finance

●  Blockchain literacy, i.e. familiar with the space, tooling, latest developments, etc.

●  Token engineering and cryptoeconomics

●  Financial instrument design and modelling

●  Legal hacker, e.g. tokenization of real-world assets and decentralised organisations (DAOs)

●  Knowledge of blockchain-relevant programming language, e.g. Solidity, Javascript, Typescript, Go, Rust etc. (include Github with application)

●  Data science for ecological state data, e.g. remote-sensing technologies

●  Open source ecosystem development

●  Environmental policy innovation

●  Operations knowledge, e.g. practical understanding of running & scaling up a project quickly

OUR OFFER

Taking a Founder role at DSV is a fantastic opportunity to develop concepts for, and launch your own startup. Working with us, we’ll pay you to start your own company with access to co-founders and pre-seed funding. We’ll also continuously support you in building the venture and developing early data to land your first customers and investors.

Compared to other Entrepreneur in Residence programmes, DSV’s is friendly to individuals with no previous founder experience and comes with a commitment from us to support your company throughout its journey.

In order to avoid the catastrophic effects of climate change, radical changes to human activity are required.

The economy is one of the main drivers of human behaviour and activity.In the current economy, economic actors are incentivised to extract natural and social capital, in exchange for money. Little or no consideration is given to the side-effects (the positive and negative externalities) of extraction, production and consumption. However, the world’s resources are finite and therefore the extractive model of our economy is unsustainable. In other words, we are failing to “stay within our doughnut”.

On the other side of the coin, an economic system is perhaps the most powerful lever for systemic change. Resource allocation dictates which processes do and do not take place, and indirectly, what we value as a society.

How might we go about creating a planet-positive economy?

 

Constraints

Resource allocation decisions are made on the basis of a cost-benefit analysis, formal or otherwise. Capital allocation decisions are overwhelmingly made on the basis of risk and return: where will the risk-adjusted return be the highest? With this behaviour in mind (“capital will tend towards where it will generate more capital”), why is capital not flowing towards “climate-positive” or “planet-positive” activities in sufficient volume?

There are four main reasons:

1. Tragedy of the commons

• Economic actors — whether companies, governments, communities, or individuals — are incentivised to consume common-pool resources at the expense of all other actors, without any penalty, costs or tax, leading to depletion of the resource.

• Entities prioritise organizational gain over the needs of society and the planet.

 

2.  Polluting is less costly than not polluting

• Actors will opt against polluting when the cost of polluting outweighs the cost of not polluting. Currently, this is generally not the case.

 

3.  Polluting is more valuable than not polluting

• Actors will opt against polluting when the benefit of not polluting outweighs the benefit of polluting. Currently, this is generally not the case.

 

4.  The data required for planet-positive investment decision-making is lacking.

• To be able to categorise an asset as planet-positive or planet-negative, data is required. This data is missing, not of a good enough quality, or reliant on accurate disclosure. Often, it is more costly than beneficial for actors to gather and disclose this information.

• This problem is compounded by the lack of coverage and coherent regulation on climate disclosure.

 

Approaches we’re considering

Traditionally, solutions to these problems are viewed through the lens of regulatory change. For example, increasing the cost of pollution through government-imposed carbon pricing (whether through a tax or a market mechanism) is a potential solution to some of the negative externalities of production. Though carbon pricing is important, attempts so far have fallen far short of viable price levels and scope. Given government inaction, in spite of public pressure, it is insufficient to rely solely on governments to deal with the climate crisis.

We are exploring the creation of ventures that could sufficiently alter economic conditions to reorient capital towards “planet positive” activities. In other words, we are looking to create the building blocks of a climate — and nature — positive economy. We are exploring capital markets, financial sector, carbon markets, and commodities sector innovations including (but not limited to):

●  Capital and derivatives markets

●  Private debt and equity markets

●  Decision-making tools for sustainable/planet-positive investing

●  Planet positive financial instruments

●  Natural capital markets (e.g. carbon markets)

●  Novel applications of technologies (e.g. blockchain, remote sensing, machine learning, artificial intelligence, data science) for the above solutions

 

We are assembling the teams who will further investigate and ultimately co-found ventures in this space. We are looking for the first team members, advisors, partners and investors. Equally, we are looking to speak with anyone who has a unique or in depth perspective on the constraints and opportunities governing this space.

 

WHO should apply

You are motivated to build a company that benefits the planet. You are collaborative, committed to your teammates, and able to communicate clearly. You are creative, always asking why, and actively enjoy building a network around the problems and opportunities that you go after. You bring broad technical knowledge that is relevant to the opportunity area (see below).

 

Knowledge and skill’s we’re after (a mix of):

●  Carbon markets and climate finance

●  Blockchain literacy, i.e. familiar with the space, tooling, latest developments, etc.

●  Token engineering and cryptoeconomics

●  Financial instrument design and modelling

●  Legal hacker, e.g. tokenization of real-world assets and decentralised organisations (DAOs)

●  Knowledge of blockchain-relevant programming language, e.g. Solidity, Javascript, Typescript, Go, Rust etc. (include Github with application)

●  Data science for ecological state data, e.g. remote-sensing technologies

●  Open source ecosystem development

●  Environmental policy innovation

●  Operations knowledge, e.g. practical understanding of running & scaling up a project quickly

our offer

Taking a Founder role at DSV is a fantastic opportunity to develop concepts for, and launch your own startup. Working with us, we’ll pay you to start your own company with access to co-founders and up to £500k in pre-seed and seed funding. We’ll also continuously support you in building the venture and developing early data to land your first customers and investors.

Compared to other Entrepreneur in Residence programmes, DSV’s is friendly to individuals with no previous founder experience and comes with a commitment from us to support your company throughout its journey.

Interviews ongoing

Interviews ongoing

Negative Emissions Markets Team at DSV

current Founders

Raphaël is passionate about leveraging decentralised technologies to prevent a climate crisis. He was recently a winner in the Carbon Footprint Track of the Blockchain for Social Impact Incubator. He has been exploring the key constraints holding back today’s carbon markets, and investigating approaches that have the potential to overcome these limitations.

To learn more about Raphaël’s work, you can email him here.

Nicole is a sustainable finance professional applying data-driven, interdisciplinary approaches to designing business solutions to climate change. She’s currently investigating approaches to support commodities and financial markets with climate-smart, net-negative emissions tools.

To learn more about Nicole’s work, you can email her here.

Mo is looking for ways to accelerate the rate at which NETs are being deployed. He has spent the past few months gaining an understanding of the fundamental roadblocks in this domain, and deriving approaches to overcome them. He’s now assembling the founding teams that will build the companies that will overcome the problems in this space.

To learn more about Mo’s work, you can email him here.

Negative Emissions Markets Team at DSV

current Founders

Raphaël is passionate about leveraging decentralised technologies to prevent a climate crisis. He was recently a winner in the Carbon Footprint Track of the Blockchain for Social Impact Incubator. He has been exploring the key constraints holding back today’s carbon markets, and investigating approaches that have the potential to overcome these limitations.

To learn more about Raphaël’s work, you can email him here.

Nicole is a sustainable finance professional applying data-driven, interdisciplinary approaches to designing business solutions to climate change. She’s currently investigating approaches to support commodities and financial markets with climate-smart, net-negative emissions tools.

To learn more about Nicole’s work, you can email her here.

Mo is looking for ways to accelerate the rate at which NETs are being deployed. He has spent the past few months gaining an understanding of the fundamental roadblocks in this domain, and deriving approaches to overcome them. He’s now assembling the founding teams that will build the companies that will overcome the problems in this space.

To learn more about Mo’s work, you can email him here.

Negative Emissions Markets Team at DSV

current Founders

Raphaël is passionate about leveraging decentralised technologies to prevent a climate crisis. He was recently a winner in the Carbon Footprint Track of the Blockchain for Social Impact Incubator. He has been exploring the key constraints holding back today’s carbon markets, and investigating approaches that have the potential to overcome these limitations.

To learn more about Raphaël’s work, you can email him here.

Nicole is a sustainable finance professional applying data-driven, interdisciplinary approaches to designing business solutions to climate change. She’s currently investigating approaches to support commodities and financial markets with climate-smart, net-negative emissions tools.

To learn more about Nicole’s work, you can email her here.

Mo is looking for ways to accelerate the rate at which NETs are being deployed. He has spent the past few months gaining an understanding of the fundamental roadblocks in this domain, and deriving approaches to overcome them. He’s now assembling the founding teams that will build the companies that will overcome the problems in this space.

To learn more about Mo’s work, you can email him here.