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JOIN OUR EFFORTS TO

close the carbon cycle

BY LAUNCHING SCIENCE COMPANIES.

JOIN OUR EFFORTS TO

close the carbon cycle

BY LAUNCHING SCIENCE COMPANIES.
Gael Gobaille-Shaw, Founding Analyst for Carbon Neutral Fuels at DSV making a case to the O&G industry in Aberdeen.

 

Nature has utilised CO2 since the evolution of photosynthesis, and yet all we seem to be able to do is produce it. Just imagine a world where CO2 is not a waste but a resource…
But the question remains, what should we make if we could transform CO2 or other “wastes”? Pursue synthesising petrochemicals? Or are there alternative compounds with superior properties? The area of carbon neutral fuels is like a battleground of different molecules vying for supremacy. Many arguments for the strengths of a particular fuel seem to be relatively narrow, giving too much focus on a single metric e.g. energy density, and do not offer a systematic analysis of the product space from a market-based, transformational and technological perspective.

 

 

APPROACHES WE’RE CONSIDERING

 

Integrated carbon capture and utilisation
CO2 capture is endothermic, while it’s hydrogenation to methane or methanol is exothermic. Marrying these two processes in the flue-gas of a power plant allows CO2 capture to be done without expending energy to release CO2, instead energy simply goes into producing hydrogen to perform the hydrogenation reaction and waste heat from the flue gas is also utilised.
Promising work has been undertaken by Dr. Melis Duyar from Surrey University with producing methane from simulated flue gas. The technology could be optimised towards producing methanol relatively quickly, but the longer-term view would be to develop the technology towards longer chain carbons and synthetic fuels.
Skills we’re after (a mix of):
Chemical or process engineering, catalyst engineering, someone with experience with reactor design, plant design, process development. Ideally, worked with syngas or flue gas, fisher-tropsch, modelling and optimisation.

 

Waste sources to valuable products
In general, waste streams are simply feedstocks that we have not yet generated processes for transforming them into valuable products. It is only out of laziness, perspective or a lack of ingenuity that they are considered waste. Perceived waste takes many forms, from methane in oil fields to CO2 from combustion (or the air) and biological sources such as agriculture. By identifying “waste” streams that are big enough to produce significant quantities of carbon neutral fuels or chemicals, we could reveal some exciting and unexplored opportunities. If such a process could incorporate carbon capture while also providing a means of storing renewable electricity, it would have a very impactful and compelling value proposition. We’ve seen biogas production from food waste grow rapidly in the UK, what other waste streams could be used?

 

Accelerating catalyst design
A major bottleneck in all chemical transformations is the development of stable and efficient catalysts. The pathway to the successful development of catalysts is a long process involving large amounts of manual labour to synthesise, characterise and test them under reaction conditions. There does yet appear to be a consolidated and holistic strategy being implemented to address this. Instead we have a fragmented approach of lots of entities. Some companies specialise in bulk production of catalysts and ex-situ characterisation while some companies focus on reactor optimisation and others specialise in computational modelling (either at the catalyst level or reactor level). Universities are similarly fragmented, each trying to solve individual pieces of the puzzle without necessarily appreciating how the entire problem is put together. What if we were able to bring together automation of production and characterisation, DFT simulations with machine learning algorithms and operando measurements under a single roof?
Skills we’re after (a mix of):
Fuel cell engineering, catalyst engineering, someone with experience with modelling, automation, operando measurements, catalyst synthesis, testing, formulation, machine learning, material design, nanomaterials, and ideally, electrolysers, electrode microstructures, chemistry.
OUR OFFER
An opportunity to co-found a company and receive pre-seed investment within three months of joining. We’ll work closely with you on venture de-risking and make sure there’s the right team (including advisors), funding and commercial traction in place before spinning-out.
At DSV, we have partnerships with some of the world’s leading companies in the industry to support our teams working on transition to clean fuels. There’s up to £500k of investment, and at least £100k in grant funding, plus the further opportunity to carry out 6 figure industrial proof of concept work.
No prior idea or IP required.
Gael Gobaille-Shaw, Founding Analyst for Carbon Neutral Fuels at DSV making a case to the O&G industry in Aberdeen.
Nature has utilised CO2 since the evolution of photosynthesis, and yet all we seem to be able to do is produce it. Just imagine a world where CO2 is not a waste but a resource…
But the question remains, what should we make if we could transform CO2 or other “wastes”? Pursue synthesising petrochemicals? Or are there alternative compounds with superior properties? The area of carbon neutral fuels is like a battleground of different molecules vying for supremacy. Many arguments for the strengths of a particular fuel seem to be relatively narrow, giving too much focus on a single metric e.g. energy density, and do not offer a systematic analysis of the product space from a market-based, transformational and technological perspective.

 

 

APPROACHES WE’RE CONSIDERING

 

Integrated carbon capture and utilisation
CO2 capture is endothermic, while it’s hydrogenation to methane or methanol is exothermic. Marrying these two processes in the flue-gas of a power plant allows CO2 capture to be done without expending energy to release CO2, instead energy simply goes into producing hydrogen to perform the hydrogenation reaction and waste heat from the flue gas is also utilised.
Promising work has been undertaken by Dr. Melis Duyar from Surrey University with producing methane from simulated flue gas. The technology could be optimised towards producing methanol relatively quickly, but the longer-term view would be to develop the technology towards longer chain carbons and synthetic fuels.
Skills we’re after (a mix of):
Chemical or process engineering, catalyst engineering, someone with experience with reactor design, plant design, process development. Ideally, worked with syngas or flue gas, fisher-tropsch, modelling and optimisation.

 

Waste sources to valuable products
In general, waste streams are simply feedstocks that we have not yet generated processes for transforming them into valuable products. It is only out of laziness, perspective or a lack of ingenuity that they are considered waste. Perceived waste takes many forms, from methane in oil fields to CO2 from combustion (or the air) and biological sources such as agriculture. By identifying “waste” streams that are big enough to produce significant quantities of carbon neutral fuels or chemicals, we could reveal some exciting and unexplored opportunities. If such a process could incorporate carbon capture while also providing a means of storing renewable electricity, it would have a very impactful and compelling value proposition. We’ve seen biogas production from food waste grow rapidly in the UK, what other waste streams could be used?

 

Accelerating catalyst design
A major bottleneck in all chemical transformations is the development of stable and efficient catalysts. The pathway to the successful development of catalysts is a long process involving large amounts of manual labour to synthesise, characterise and test them under reaction conditions. There does yet appear to be a consolidated and holistic strategy being implemented to address this. Instead we have a fragmented approach of lots of entities. Some companies specialise in bulk production of catalysts and ex-situ characterisation while some companies focus on reactor optimisation and others specialise in computational modelling (either at the catalyst level or reactor level). Universities are similarly fragmented, each trying to solve individual pieces of the puzzle without necessarily appreciating how the entire problem is put together. What if we were able to bring together automation of production and characterisation, DFT simulations with machine learning algorithms and operando measurements under a single roof?
Skills we’re after (a mix of):
Fuel cell engineering, catalyst engineering, someone with experience with modelling, automation, operando measurements, catalyst synthesis, testing, formulation, machine learning, material design, nanomaterials, and ideally, electrolysers, electrode microstructures, chemistry.
our offer
An opportunity to co-found a company and receive pre-seed investment within three months of joining. We’ll work closely with you on venture de-risking and make sure there’s the right team (including advisors), funding and commercial traction in place before spinning-out.
At DSV, we have partnerships with some of the world’s leading companies in the industry to support our teams working on transition to clean fuels. There’s up to £500k of investment, and at least £100k in grant funding, plus the further opportunity to carry out 6 figure industrial proof of concept work.
No prior idea or IP required.

Interviews ongoing

Interviews ongoing

About Gael

Gael Gobaille-Shaw (PhD Chemistry) leads opportunity analysis in carbon neutral fuels at DSV and has spent the past few months mapping out key constraints holding back innovation (across tech, market and funding realms). Together with Gael, we’ve identified key areas of expertise that need to be brought together before spinning out ventures in this space.

To learn more about Gael’s work, you can email him here.

About Gael

Gael Gobaille-Shaw (PhD Chemistry) leads opportunity analysis in carbon neutral fuels at DSV and has spent the past few months mapping out key constraints holding back innovation (across tech, market and funding realms). Together with Gael, we’ve identified key areas of expertise that need to be brought together before spinning out ventures in this space.

To learn more about Gael’s work, you can email him here.